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An Overview of Crimes and Possible Jail Times

The legal system is complex. There are various steps those arrested go through before they are charged by a court. When it comes to crime, there are many subtypes and definitions. The length and location of incarceration for those found guilty depend upon the crimes with which they are charged. A person can be charged for committing either a misdemeanor or a felony. Here is an overview of offenses by category and potential jail times.

Misdemeanors

Misdemeanors are considered lesser crimes, though they can have serious consequences. They include:

  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or other substances
  • Possessing guns
  • Drug charges
  • Assault and battery

Often, jail times for those convicted of misdemeanors are less than a year, and some people may not even be given custodial sentences. Many use Wayne County bail bonds to get out of jail before their trials. Sometimes theft is considered a misdemeanor if the object taken is of relatively low value, often considered to be an amount less than $1,000. However, thefts of items with larger price tags are considered to be more serious crimes called felonies.

Felonies

These crimes are considered to be the most serious in the legal system. They include:

  • Murder
  • Manslaughter
  • Rape
  • Burglary
  • Robbery

Felonies generally draw prison time for those charged with and convicted of committing them. They can expect to spend at least a year in prison, rather than a county jail, and depending upon the nature of the crime, some offenders can receive much harsher penalties, including life in prison or capital punishment.

Crimes and Jail Times

While the legal system may seem confusing and complex, there are specific categories and guidelines that determine where a particular crime falls within the judicial spectrum. Less serious crimes often require less jail time or sometimes none at all, while serious crimes can draw the ultimate penalty, depending upon circumstances. Ultimately, the driving force behind the national legal system is to protect citizens and maintain an orderly life for all.

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